So, you might ask, what makes our monitoring station special?

The answer is two-fold:

1.) Our seismograph is securely anchored to a three mile in-diameter boulder, most of which is buried below ground. This large rock formation is believed to actually protrude more than several miles into the earth's crust. We don't know for sure yet, how deep it all goes...

2.) Signal amplification. The terminals of our in ground sensors have a 10 to the 12th power gain or amplification to the deflector plates in our scope. The paper chart-recorder is adjusted down to a level that yields good results somewhere around 10 to the 8th, without a fly farting in Mexico, throwing it all off...

More will be added soon...
The markings on this chart are really arbitrary as far as magnitude is concerned, even though they accurately convey the magnitude of seismic events on our planet.

Funding is not yet in place which would allow us to calibrate our super sensitive system to standards currently in use.

At this point we are grateful to just have paper and ink for our recorders...
Here is an except from one of our January chart rolls, beginning at aprox. 2:00 PM PST on Saturday, January 09, 2010 and ending on Tuesday, January 12, 2010 at around 10:00 PM leading up to the the Haiti Quake. The individual sheets were scanned and combined using CS2. The file is 3.9 MB. The quake closest to the top is the Haiti quake and the one towards the bottom is the 6.5 magnitude California Offshore quake which occurred on Saturday January 09 2010 at 4:30 PM.
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Haiti Quake:

12th of January, 2010 at 21:53:10 UTC as recorded by our monitoring station in Southern California. Notice the initial shock-wave at 2:00 PM with the reactionary wave following 20 minutes thereafter.
Chilean Quake:

27th of February, 2010 at 6:34:14 UTC as recorded by our monitoring station in Southern California. Please ignore the green line on the left which is the signal from our underground antenna recorded at a previous time and has no relevance to the Chilean Quake (due to a paper shortage, some of the rolls are run through a different chart recorder again). As more of preceding and following parts of the chart become available they will be posted.
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Mexico Quake:

April 4th 2010 at 22:40:41 UTC 7.2 Magnitude Earthquake as recorded by our monitoring station in Southern California. Noteworthy is the slowly increasing needle deflection leading up to the quake more than 24 hours before the actual quake and the fore-shocks which seem to occur at approximately 4 hour intervals. It was obvious that something big was about to happen. If we had two other stations in operation we could likely have pinpointed the location. (File size is 6.2 MB)
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This is an oldie but goodie: The 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake which occurred on Dec 26, 2004 at 00:58:53 UTC, estimated at 9.1 to 9.3 on the Richter Scale.

What is significant about this chart is that it is easy to see - to the degree of being obvious, that something is brewing 12 hours in advance...
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